Essential information for end of life vehicle dismantling, depollution and recycling

Adam Hewitt
Combilift
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Three men fined for Alston illegal waste sites

Three men from Cumbria have been ordered to pay fines and costs totalling almost £10,000 for operating four illegal waste sites at Alston.

 

Three men fined for Alston illegal waste sites f
Waste stored at the Clarghyll Colliery site

Father and son Keith and Paul Liverick pleaded guilty when they appeared at Carlisle Magistrates’ Court on Wednesday 30 March.

Keith, 74, of Station Road, Alston, pleaded guilty to two charges of operating illegal waste sites, while Paul, 51, of the same address, pleaded guilty to one charge of the same offence, and two charges of illegally depositing waste.

Their associate Frank Shepherd, 77, of Leadgate, Alston, had pleaded guilty at an earlier hearing to a charge of operating an illegal waste site, and a second charge of burning waste on land.

The court heard that each of the four sites; Clarghyll Colliery, land at the rear of Moredun Garage, Old Foundry Yard, and Rotherthorpe Old Mine, had varying environmental permits and permit exemptions in place to allow for restricted waste deposits and activities.

None of the sites had an environmental permit to allow for the importing, depositing, treatment or sorting of mixed waste. Environmental permits impose conditions on waste operators to govern the type of waste and the type of activity permitted on a given site.

These conditions are designed to reduce the risk of pollution and harm to the environment arising out of the site activities. Environmental permits are designed to protect people and the environment and failure to comply is a serious offence that can damage the environment, undermine legitimate businesses, put jobs and risk and cause misery for local communities.

Between August and November 2018, Environment Agency officers made visits to each of the sites, where they saw illegal deposits of large amounts of mixed waste, which included scrap vehicles, skips of household waste, plastics, timber and construction waste.

Over the ensuing two years, officers tried to work with the operators to bring the sites into compliance, but advice and notices were largely ignored.

In mitigation, Shepherd was remorseful, while both Paul and Keith Liverick said it was caused by poor management of the sites.

Andrew Turner, Area Environment Manager for the Environment Agency in the North East, said:

“All three showed a blatant disregard for the environment over a great length of time and seemed to think the rules did not apply to them.

They deliberately and persistently allowed the deposit and storage of waste on these sites knowing the activity was illegal and presented a risk of harm to the environment. They did this in the face of officers working hard to encourage compliance.

We work hard to prevent and disrupt waste crime and we’re pleased all three have admitted wrong-doing.”

Shepherd was fined £666 and ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £67 and costs of £400; Keith Liverick was fined £1,980 and ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £190 and costs of £1,350, while Paul Liverick was fined £2,566, ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £190 and costs of £2,200.

Environmental incidents can be reported to the Environment Agency 24/7 on 0800 807060.

Waste crime can also be reported anonymously via Crimestoppers online or on 0800 555111.

Source www.gov.uk

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Owain Griffiths

Owain Griffiths

Head of Circular Economy at Volvo Cars

Owain joined Volvo Cars in June 2021 to lead Circular Economy in the Global Sustainability Team. The company has committed to being a circular business by 2040 and has financial, recycled content and CO2 based targets for 2025, all of which Owain is working across the company to make happen. Owain previously worked for circular economy consultancy Oakdene Hollins where he advised businesses on evidence led circular economy implementation. 

Turning into a circular business and the importance of vehicle reuse and recycling.

The presentation will cover the work Volvo Cars is doing to achieve 2025 but mainly focus on the transformational work towards 2040 and the business and value chain changes being considered. Attention will be paid to the way vehicles are being dealt with at the end of life and the complexities of closing material and component loops. Opportunities and challenges which Volvo Cars is facing will be presented including engagement with 3rd parties and increasing pressure from stakeholders.